Archive for October, 2009

Join Me November 18 for the Launch of the Do-It-Together Club

Friday, October 30th, 2009

Join Me November 18 for the Launch of the Do-It-Together Club for Entrepreneurs and Sales/Marketing Folks.



If you’re local in Southern California, you have the once-in-a-lifetime opportunity to join me as I coach you along with business owners, sales representatives and marketing folks in workshops and one-on-one sessions. You get amazing bonuses worth $2300 in value. Sponsored by United Chambers, you pay a very small fee to join us – (at the chamber member price).

Ready to sign up? Click Do-It-Together Club for all the information.


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    Do-It-Together Club for Entrepreneurs

    Wednesday, October 28th, 2009

    Nance Rosen’s October 27, 2009 keynote to the United Chambers of Commerce on Personal Branding: How to Build Your Reputation & Gain Visibility for Your Organization. Nance spoke on increasing company value, developing new relationships to increase revenue, and the new Do-It-Together Club for Entrepreneurs.

    Personal Branding: How to Build Your Reputation & Gain Visibility for Your Organization from PegasusMediaWorld on Vimeo.

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    Social Media Friends, an Oxymoron?

    Tuesday, October 27th, 2009

    Short of being a known serial killer who’s lost his Internet privileges, anyone can get introduced to you.

    Who is requesting your friendship?

    Who is requesting your friendship?

    You’re probably on Twitter, LinkedIn and Facebook, and otherwise connected in much less than six degrees to every soul on the planet, with more being born every day. Isn’t that why you’re building your personal brand?

    What do you make of these “connections” or offers of “friendship?” And, do you really feel “followed?” on Twttter? I’ve actually been followed in real life and they arrested the guy. It was scary. I wish Twitter had chosen another word.

    Bus Pass Pals

    Certainly, these relationships start off feeling contrived, mostly because they aren’t earned. It’s like sitting on a bus last Tuesday, and because there were other people on that bus, inviting those people – and people who know them – to a reunion the following week where you all share your personal photo albums. Only, the reunion is held in a complete stranger’s house in a town you only pass through when you’re bored or can’t sleep, and someone keeps shouting: Lose Weight Fast! or whatever messages you get on Facebook.

    I may just be feeling this now because a bunch of people who know people who know me requested my friendship on Facebook today.  Some of them took unfortunately scary photos, not Halloween scary, just unattractive. Not everyone is photogenic or realizes a photo is worth a thousand words about your personal brand, so these may actually be extremely good-looking people in real life.

    But, I felt obligated to click on their faces in order to scrutinize who were our alleged mutual friends. Turns out each request came from a person who is a friend of a friend of a friend of mine. I have slowly inherited other people’s friends, and probably so have you. So, I welcomed everyone to read my angry posts about healthcare and the war, as well as what I occasionally cook for dinner or feel you should know about the weather in Southern California. You know, my posts.

    Act As If You Are

    How do you bridge the empty feelings of social media?

    How do you bridge the empty feelings of social media?

    What’s it going to take to really connect and warm up to the people we’re linked to or following as we build something real from our personal branding efforts? It’s probably like real life. We’re probably going to have to care about each other. Argue a little. Be bored but still willing to listen. Occasionally, be shocked. Just like we are with our real friends.

    But, we have to work to bridge that empty feeling factor. So much personal brand outreach feels like getting the can without the Coke inside.

    The worst for me is my LoserIn groups, which is what LinkedIn groups feel like, since 98% of the questions my fellow group members ask are getting goose eggs in terms of response. Sometimes I feel bad enough for the person who’s posted the question, that I give a pity response. That’s like pity applause when the only people laughing during Jay Leno are the people he pays, like Kevin Eubanks. And by the way, what a lonely, empty hour that is! I did some pity watching one night, but ran out of pity before the first commercial.

    A Waste of Space

    Jay Leno isn’t funny, but he plays the part of someone who should be funny. He is sort of funny looking like most comedians are. He has a prepared monologue filled with snipes about men sleeping with women who aren’t their wives. He has the same tiresome celebrity guests who couldn’t possibly enjoy making the rounds of these shows, and a band leader.

    A show just filling airtime

    A lot of social media sites are the same. They are filling airtime. They really aren’t helping most people do the work of personal branding, which is to make a lasting impression and engage an audience.

    My real friends will help me move my couch. My real connections will tip me off about a great new

    Does social media simply fill airtime for you?

    Does social media simply fill airtime for you?

    supplier or potential client. I bring soup to my real friends who are ill. I tell my real network about job openings they can apply for and new projects they can bid on, and encourage them to use my name if it helps their cause.

    Do This

    I think this would be a good week go through your friends, followers and connections list and see if there’s anything you can do for anyone. You might make a real friend, which could just be more valuable right now than the financial ROI we’re all waiting to see come from personal branding and social media.

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    Get Really Personal with Your Personal Brand

    Tuesday, October 20th, 2009
    What is your brands DNA?

    What is your brands DNA?

    You might not be the offspring of Trump, Branson or Vanderbilt, but you do have a personal brand legacy. Consider your heritage: your parents, community, region, country, culture and ancestry. Pegging to your authentic underpinnings, which is your brand DNA, might be the platform you need right now, as you define the constellation of characteristics that sell you as a personal brand.

    Of course, it helps if the name, brains and trust fund you inherit get you through Wharton without student loans and onto Trump National golf course with a really good tee time.

    Just keep in mind: jealousy isn’t a strategy. You probably inherited better hair and a less bellicose manner (or just a better catch phrase than “you’re fired!”) than the Trump brood. Most star power personal brands come laded with such big baggage that legacy brands don’t really have a chance to shine on their own. The results may vary, but Jamie Spears’ fate is lot more common than Miley Cyrus.

    Anderson Cooper has kept his family’s personal brand legacy pretty much a secret. He’s a Vanderbilt (robber baron and jeans queen) on the one side and the son of Wyatt Cooper (actor and writer) on the other. Anderson is kind of like Sprite. The world’s most popular lemon-lime beverage is the offspring of Coke, but you don’t see Sprite being marketed as a junior brand. However, both Anderson and Sprite appreciate their heritage, and have taken advantage of the lessons learned on their family brands’ climb up the ladder.

    How bravely did your family leave everything familiar to immigrate to where you now call home?

    How bravely did your family leave everything familiar to immigrate to where you now call home?

    So, if you are the scion of a milkman and homemaker (me!), you might have to do more digging to find gold. What are you looking for? Great stories, the older the better. For example: how bravely did your family leave everything familiar to immigrate to where you now call home? Or how did they stay and defend the homestead while under siege? Who sacrificed so someone else could go to school? Who had talent like playing a musical instrument but never risked the farm to make it a career?

    Stories of perseverance, pride, principles, and personalities that inspire you are what you need now. Open up a dialogue with purpose: appreciate the people who weren’t thinking about personal brands, because they had simpler, smaller dreams and maybe more formidable obstacles or opponents.

    Ask the right questions and have patience when you sort through the meaning in the answers. Consider this your personal brand DNA mapping.

    1. Gather your old family photos and have the “what’s my heritage” talk with your folks.
    2. Listen for the stories of how your forebears overcame adversity, or failed to reach their potential.
    3. Decide if there are any dreams or lessons you’d like to build on.
    4. When it’s appropriate, reference these experiences in your job interviews, client calls and networking. Knowing where you came from is a component of the world’s most attractive quality: genuine self-confidence.

    Nance Rosen is the author of Speak Up! & Succeed. She speaks to business audiences around the world and is a resource for press, including print, broadcast and online journalists and bloggers covering social media and careers. Read more at NanceRosenBlog. Twitter name: nancerosen.

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    It’s Not Who You Are, It’s What You Mean.

    Tuesday, October 13th, 2009

    It’s not who you are if you’re trying to sell yourself on your stats: as a bundle of skills and experience, you’re going to lose out to competitors who know what they mean and are promoting that to employers and prospects.

    The goal of your personal brand effort has got to answer this one question: what do you mean to your

    It's not who you are, it's what you mean.

    It's not who you are, it's what you mean.

    target group (or what will you mean when you get it together? As Phyllis Korkki writes in the New York Times, communicating that you are “hard-working, flexible, cooperative and witty,” will allow recruiters and clients to see what you would mean to the organization, not just what you can do.

    Romancing your brand.

    Personal brand strategists could learn a lot from the literature on romance. Men fall in love with women who make them “feel” a certain way. These women can be encouraging, admiring, demanding, angry and anywhere along the dotted line from angel to devil. The one thing that the loved have in common is not perfect hair and great bodies. These women mean something to the men they connect with. Someone to save, someone to adore, someone to fight out the demons of the past, someone to rely on when times are tough, someone they would take a bullet for: this is what generates commitment.

    I live in Los Angeles, the capital of beautiful, toned, and educated women who are alone every Saturday night. They start out like this at 22 and continue until they’re 50, when they decide that having cats means they are no longer alone. Their “best years” are dotted by “hanging out” with a man now and then. Their regular dates are other womenwho are equally lovely and absolutely hopeless about finding a long-lasting, loving connection.

    Last Friday night, I went out with my fiancé to meet these women and the men who would chill with them, but not settledown with them. It was 9:30 PM at an uber cool saloon, Pink Taco in Century City. We were there for a going-away party for Adam, an athletic, sweet, handsome and single physical therapist. Every other man at the party was almost a clone: hunky, nice, funny and hard-working.

    The women there had all chilled with these men. Yet it looked like a middle school dance, except the guys didn’t look awkward at all. They were laughing and talking, mostly making fun of each other in that guy-bonding way. The women were talking to each other about work and not dating.  I know these women because we chat each other up at the gym and at get-togethers like this one. They have really interesting jobs or are wrestling with challenges like finding a job, they have great family relationships and they all look like models. They just haven’t hunkered down on the one thing that matters in creating a relationship: what do I mean to someone else?

    What do you mean to someone else?

    What doe you mean to someone else?

    What doe you mean to someone else?

    Vibrant personal brands and big brands present a promise of what consumers will enjoy and why it’s worth it to commit to owning this one thing – to the exclusion of owning something else. With so much competition, it’s not enough for the contents of the can or the resume to be jam packed with good things.

    What Harvard Professor Gerald Zaltman calls “deep metaphors,” and I call “ideal qualities of life” are what you want to communicate with your personal brand. Zaltman’s research on Coke shows that the brand has successfully embedded the promise of “connection” to the soda. Connection to others and even more importantly, connection to the self are what consumers are buying: not the syrup and bubbly water in the cool red can. What Coke means is people holding hands and singing the same song or the pause the refreshes, which a radio spot successfully broadcasts just by the sound of ice clinking and soda effervescing in a glass. Ahhh.

    You connect your brand

    Whether you’re seeking a job or going after clients (or trying to get a promotion or project approved), start off by

    You connect your brand

    You connect your brand

    communicating the quality you deliver that elevates an organization’s standard of living. Of course, if you have a big book of business and you’re in sales, then it’s pretty clear: revenue means power. But, if you are in another occupation consider what you could mean.

    Get your achievements organized so they all lead to a recruiter or prospect to say: “Wow, this individual would be a force of ______________ in my company.”

    Need some hints? Below are just some of personal brand values you may be:
    Vitality
    Creativity
    Resourcefulness
    Courage
    Humor
    Empowerment
    Security
    Legacy
    Persistence

    Author: Nance Rosen is the author of Speak Up! & Succeed. She frequently speaks to business audiences around the world and is a resource for press, including print, broadcast and online journalists and bloggers covering social media and careers.

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    You Are a Global Brand

    Monday, October 12th, 2009

    You are a Global Personal Brand from PegasusMediaWorld on Vimeo.

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    What Sex Can and Can’t Sell

    Tuesday, October 6th, 2009

    Sex is the core of many celebrities’ personal brands. These popsugar people make a living being hot. They play out their lives with others who are just as hot. Megan, Brian, Scarlett, Ryan, Brad, Angelina, Gisele, Tom and the phalanx of usual suspects dance among their own kind. Their brand

    Sexy Sells

    Sexy Sells

    images are not just the output of stylists and press agents. Sex is the brand born out by these celebs’ behavior. It works because, like the core elements of all successful personal brands, sex isn’t just aped by these lookers. Sex is embedded in their characters, it’s authentically embodied and it’s relentlessly, consistently and clearly communicated, with well chosen co-branding partners.

    Sex isn’t the same as “sex appeal,” which was a quaint notion that some people have a kind of “X” factor. Paul Newman projected that intense, undeniable magnetism. At the same time, he was a devoted married man for 50 years. Newman and his wife, the very elegant Joanne Woodward, enjoyed a very un-Hollywood life in Connecticut. In a then timely but now quaint simile, Newman told a too-inquiring member of the press that he didn’t need to eat hamburger out of town because he had steak at home.

    Sex still sells

    By contrast, today’s celebrity X-factor pretty much means X-rated, with proof of concept. We watch Kendra Wilkinson jump off The Girls Next Door to move on down the aisle with her baby bump to wed pro athlete Hank Baskett. If you haven’t seen enough Kardashians, more’s on the way as Kourtney sports a bump as the result of off-again, on-again relations with Scott Disick, or so says People magazine.

    Good for them? Yes. As marketers and civilians alike know: sex sells. That’s why sex is such a powerful personal brand element. It sells movies, magazines, music and more.

    Sex goes wrong

    So how can a great personal branding technique as old as sex go horribly wrong?

    This week another married man from Connecticut came forward to tell us he’s a victim of his sexiness. That unlikely man is David Letterman. Apparently, untold numbers of young assistants throughout the years find sex with him consensually impossible to resist.

    Apparently, he regularly hires small armies of young women assistants, and in his public words has “creepy” sex with some of them. Letterman’s utter lack of contrition and just plain conscience about the lives he tainted, evoked the mindset of a plantation owner. The master knew whomever he choose to serve the family in the plantation house got a better job than most, and it was a job worth doing what it took to keep. Kind of like serving a production company owner and talk show star, and occasionally looking after his son.

    When the story broke, I watched a clip featuring Letterman and one of his “favored” assistants. They were playing Letterman’s signature bit “know your cuts of meat. It was a rude simile, given the situation.

    In the bit, Letterman’s assistant, lucky to get that camera time, was cast in the role of trying to guess the piece of meat, as she looked at pictures of meat flashed on the screen. She played the ditz, got it wrong and everyone laughed. He asked her if she wanted to play again. Playing the patsy, she did. She never did get one right.

    lateshow

    Is it acceptable?

    Some things are just really hard to watch.

    This isn’t the dance of equals, like Brad and Angelina meeting on the set of Mr. and Mrs. Smith and leaving Jennifer to be America’s aging sweetheart. This isn’t watching Julia Roberts get serially engaged to one leading man after another until she finds settles on Danny for her happily ever after. This isn’t Tom making babies with Bridget and Gisele.

    This isn’t even a reality show where people sign up to exploit their bodies and bad habits.

    It took a celebrity to prove that sex can’t sell everything. Maybe even another season of the Late Show with David Letterman.

    Author:
    Nance Rosen is the author of Speak Up! & Succeed. She speaks to business audiences around the world and is a resource for press, including print, broadcast and online journalists and bloggers covering social media and careers.

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